Martin Luther King, Jr. "Freedom has always been an expensive thing."

Martin Luther King, jr. (1929-1968) led millions of people in a non-violent movement to bring an end to the segregation of the races in the United States.

The vision of a community of men in which all are free still provides the basis for continued efforts to overcome domination.

His words eloquently express this passion and this faith: “You ought to believe something in life, believe that thing so ferently that you will stand up with it till the end of yur days…” express for him how freedom and hope are realized,

He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

  • Poster 18″x24″, printed in full color in the U.S. on heavyweight paper
  • USPS shipping tubeThe poster shipped rolled in a recyclable cardboard tube inside a USPS Priority Mailing tube. The odd shape incurs an extra charge from the post office.
  • Notecard 4.5″x6″, blank inside w/envelope
  • Bookmark 1.25″x6″
  • Artist: Frank Szasz
  • more MLK Quotes and Links for Learning
Martin Luther King, Jr. Global PathMarker
Shop and Checkout with PayPal
Albert Einstein "Imagination is more important than knowledge.'
Albert Einstein "Imagination is more important than knowledge.'
Pierre Teilhard de Chardin "The future of the earth is in our hands."
Pope John Paul II
Mother Teresa
Gandhi "Real beauty is my aim."

Description:

‘FREEDOM HAS ALWAYS BEEN AN EXPENSIVE THING’ POSTER OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. SIGNED AND INSCRIBED BY CORETTA SCOTT KING TO GENERAL POWELL
the poster depicting a portrait of Martin Luther King, Jr. after Frank Szasz, with quote ‘Freedom Has Always Been An Expensive Thing.’ warmly inscribed to General Powell in silver felt ‘To General Colin Powell/accept this likeness of Dr. King as a token of my respect, esteem and appreciation for your support.. with warmest personal regards/Coretta Scott King,’ in black metal frame.

https://www.potomackcompany.com/auction-lot/freedom-has-always-been-an-expensive-thing-post_8CB4171AB2

Catalogue note:
At the beginning of Chapter 15 of General Powell’s memoir “My American Journey,” he writes that shortly after he took over as Commander in Chief at Fort McPherson, Georgia, he hung this poster in his office. He wanted it there “to remind me, and everyone who sat in that room, of the leading role the Army had played in defending freedom and advancing racial justice.”